Norwegian Traditions

Norwegian Traditions

Every nation has a national day but probably very few of them are so enthusiastically and uniquely celebrated like May 17th. The Constitution of Norway was signed at Eidsvoll municipality in Akershus county in Norway on May 17 in the year 1814. Norway was under Swedish rule at that time. The constitution declared Norway to be an independent kingdom in an attempt to avoid being ceded to Sweden after Denmark–Norway’s devastating defeat in the Napoleonic Wars. Norwegians are proud of their nation and they also established children’s parades on the national day. In 1870, there were parades consisting of only boys. 1899 were girls allowed to join in the children’s parade for the first time.
Today, the May 17th is usually about gathering and celebrating together. The national day is for many Norwegians associated with a custom of “eat what you like” on this day, junk food is commonly on the menu, and in large quantities. What is traditionally eaten at family tables, however, often depends on where people are living. For example, near the sea and rivers, eating salmon and trout is quite common. While in the mountain villages, it can be rømme, a special porridge cooked with the special rømme ingrediency. Below you can read more about Norwegian specialties.